About MPHPBPC

About MPHPBPC, Key information

Medicinal plants and herbal products have been recognized as a sector having enormous potentials for export. It has a large domestic market, but its potential for By this time, there are some reported individual export efforts by some companies. Our closest neighbor India has an annual export turnover of more than two billion dollar. Adopting right technology, preparing an information base in respect of market and products, and acquiring appropriate skill sets required for producing products for international market will critically help the growth of the medicinal plants and herbal products as a potential export sector of Bangladesh.

Export Policy 2003-06 recognized formation of sector/product-based business promotion councils for export promotion and diversification through addressing problems related to capacities of the industry in particular. The need for forming a Council for the medicinal plants and herbal products has been felt by the industry and other stakeholders since mid-2003 following the formation of the first Council for the information and communication technology (ICT) in April 2003. This has received additional impetus with the inclusion of the medicinal plants and herbal products as a priority sector in the Export Policy 2003-06. Thus the initiative spearheaded by the Ministry of Commerce (MOC) took particular shape with the formation of a committee headed by its the then Joints Secretary (export) to draft memorandum of association (MOA) and articles of association (AOA), and a work plan for immediate implementation. The committee members included representatives from leading industry associations, related ministries, and Export Promotion Bureau (EPB). It took about two years’ intensive negotiation and dialogue among the stakeholders to preparing draft MOA and AOA for the proposed Council. Formal signing ceremony for forming a Council was held on April 09, 2006 and it was incorporated as a non-profit company under Section 28 of the Companies Act 1994 on 24 April, 2006.

Aims & Objectives

Aims & Objectives of the Council

The prime objective of forming the Council is to promote the sector to achieve competency in the local and global context as well as to help the industry building capacities in the fields of human resources and acquiring technologies.

  • To promote and facilitate the export of medicinal plants and herbal products;
  • To assist for developing medicinal plants and herbal product sectors in Bangladesh;
  • To promote the industrial utilization of medicinal plants and herbal products;
  • To promote and disseminate useful information so as to enhance the contribution of the sector to the growth and development of the national economy;
  • To develop linkage with different institutions/enterprises at home and abroad for the improvement of the medicinal plants and herbal product sector;
  • To send trade mission abroad or receiving such missions from foreign countries;
  • To provide legal support/advice to the members of the Council as may be required to safeguard the interest of the Council as well as of the industry;
  • To frame and monitor a code of business ethics and general standards of business conduct and promote fair competition and healthy trade practices among related industries;
  • To set up common facility center/institute of international level for grading or laying down the standards of quality and packing, undertaking testing and standardization of the medicinal plants and herbal products, training entrepreneurs along with a design for upgrading the technology;
  • To carry out research/study on problems and prospects of the medicinal plants and herbal products sector to achieve global competency;
  • To stimulate the production of medicinal plants and herbal products for import substitution;
  • To arrange training and educational program for human resource development;
  • To protect and safeguard the common interest of the members of the Council;
  • To undertake and execute any trusts which may be lawfully carried out by the Council and which may be conducive to the objectives of the Council;
  • To undertake model project and to provide facilitation services to the stake holders;
  • To publish journals, books, brochures, posters, flyers circulars, periodicals etc;
  • To organize exhibition, seminar, symposium, social mobilization meeting etc;
  • To institute awards, scholarships, etc, to as individuals, companies or organizations for outstanding contribution;
  • To prepare and maintain a list of experts/professionals, capable of providing advice on the related matters;
  • To undertake and settle all matters of dispute either between the Council members or between the members and others by arbitration or otherwise in accordance with the main objectives of the Council; and
  • To undertake any other activities to fulfill the aims and objectives of the Council.

Bridge Overview

An abridged overview of Bangladesh Herbal & Medicinal Plant Sector

Bangladesh was endowed with a variety of rich medicinal plants. There were times when it was the only source of medicines for vast section of population including tribal living in and around forest, areas. Rapid demographic pressure, rural poverty, absence of government appropriate policy, accelerated growth in chemical drugs and unsustainable utilization of forest resources are mainly responsible for quick erosion of these3 vital resources (S.P.Gosh & M.S.Ahmed).

International market of medicinal plants is over US$ 60 billion per year, which is growing at the rate of 7%, China and India are two great producers of medicinal plants having more than 40% of global bio-diversity. China, besides meeting its domestic requirement is earning US$ 5 billion per year from herbal trade. According to the World Bank report, 1998, world trade in medicinal plants and related products is expected to be of the order of US$ 5 trillion by AD 2050 indicating tremendous export opportunities of medicinal plants. It is estimated that current demand for medicinal plants in neighboring India for internal use is about 2.4 lac tones annually and it is growing at the rate of 20% (Source: S.P. Ghosh & M.S.Ahmed, “Prospects of Medicinal Plants in Bangladesh and Export Potentials” , paper presented at a seminar organized by Hortex Foundation on 30 June, 2005)

A recent study on Medicinal Plants Marketing in Bangladesh sponsored by SEDF and Interco operation (IC) conducted in October 2003, reviewed the current status and estimated size of the market for processed herbal medicines in Bangladesh. The SEDE/IC study estimated the “turnover figures at trade prices for Ayurvedic sector at around Tk.1000 million and Unani at around Tk.1800 million with Homeopathy standing at around Tk.500 million”. Thus totaling around Tk.3300 million (approximately US$ 60 million). According to this study the Bangladesh herbal medicines market has been growing at over 10% per annum, exceeding the allopathic sector.

The study also attempted to estimate the quantity and value of medicinal plants used as raw materials both in organized sector (large companies, small companies), unorganized sector (herbal doctors/practitioner) and spent annually on approximately 17500 tones medicinal plant (mostly dry) material.

In terms of volume, about 70% of the medicinal plants used as raw materials (over 12.5 thousand tones) come from local Bangladesh source and the remaining part is imported. In terms of value, however, the medicinal plants materials grown in Bangladesh accounts for 40% only, thus reflecting need of both crop diversification as well as quality assurance of the locally grown medicinal plants. The large 20 herbal medicines processing companies of Bangladesh alone utilizes about 25% of raw material (950 tones imported and 4500 tones of Bangladesh produce) demand, whereas another 400 smaller processing companies accounts for 30% of the demand (1150 tones imported and 4900 tones local produce).

In the past medicinal plants did not receive policy support to ensure their sustainable conservation and uses. Problems accumulated around these resources over years have led to bring colossal damage to these valuable resources. Time has come to treat medicinal plant as one of the most potential trade commodities having comparative/competitive advantage over other land-based crops. Transfer of this sector from informal to formal and integration of the development of medicinal plants from production to consumption supported by marketing and trade are the only viable options that could ensure faster growth of the sector. This has to be done reversing the current trends of depletion of medicinal resources which is a daunting task.

Executive Committee

Executive Committee of MPHPBPC

The Executive Committee of the Council is responsible to run the affairs of the council. There is an Executive Committee of the Council to run the affairs of the Council. The Executive Committee of the Council consists of the following 29 (Twenty nine) members:

Chairman : Honorable Secretary, Ministry of Commerce
1st Vice Chairman : Vice Chairman, Export Promotion Bureau
2nd Vice Chairman : President, Bangladesh Ayurvedic Aushadh Shilpa Samity
4. Additional Secretary (Export-1), Ministry of Commerce
5. Director General (MEA), Ministry of Foreign Affairs
6. Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
7. Deputy Economic Adviser, Ministry of Finance
8. Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture
9. Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forest
10. President, Federation of Bangladesh Chamber of Commerce and Industry (FBCCI)
11. Chairman, Bangladesh Small & Cottage Industries Corporation (BSCIC)
12. President, Bangladesh Herbal Products Manufacturing Association (BHPMA)
13. President, Unani Aushadh Shilpa Samity
14. President, Bangladesh Ayurvedic Aushadh Shilpa Samity
15. President, Bangladesh Homeopathic Medicine Manufacturers Association
16. Managing Director, Hamdard Laboratories (WAQF) Bangladesh
17. Managing Director, Jayson Natural Products Ltd
18. Managing Director, Modern Herbal Group of Companies
19. Executive Director, The ACME Laboratories Ltd
20. Director, Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (BCSIR)
21. Chairman, Bangladesh Neem Foundation
22. Chairman, Square Herbal & Ayurvedic Ltd.
23. President Herbal Product, Cosmetic and Dietary Supplement Manufacturers Association of Bangladesh

General Information

What is Traditional Medicine & Herbal Medicine?

  • Traditional medicine is the sum total of knowledge, skills and practices based on the theories, beliefs and experiences indigenous to different cultures that are used to maintain health, as well as to prevent, diagnose, improve or treat physical and mental illnesses
    Traditional medicine that has been adopted by other populations (outside its indigenous culture) is often termed alternative or complementary medicine.
  • Herbal medicines include herbs, herbal materials, herbal preparations, and finished herbal products that contain parts of plants or other plant materials as active ingredients.

What is Medicinal Plant?

  • A considerable number of definitions have been proposed for medicinal plants. According to the WHO, “A medicinal plant is any plant which, in one or more of its organs, contains substances that can be used for therapeutic purposes, or which are precursors for chemo-pharmaceutical semi-synthesis.” When a plant is designated as ‘medicinal’, it is implied that the said plant is useful as a drug or therapeutic agent or an active ingredient of a medicinal preparation. Medicinal plants may therefore be defined as a group of plants that possess some special properties or virtues that qualify them as articles of drugs and therapeutic agents, and are used for medicinal purposes
  • A total of 2, 50,000 species of flowring plants are referred to as medicinal plants. The World Health Organizations (WHO) enlisted some 21,000 medicinal plant species.

Who uses traditional medicine?

  • In some Asian and African countries, 80% of the population depends on traditional medicine for primary health care.
  • In many developed countries, 70% to 80% of the population has used some form of alternative or complementary medicine (e.g. acupuncture).
  • According to WHO About 25% of modern medicines are descended from plants that were first used traditionally. Likewise, almost 70% of modern medicines in India are derived from natural products.

Medicinal Plant for Biodiversity conservation:

Figure: A pictorial view of medicinal plants for biodiversity conservation

Global Overview

Global Market Trend & driving factors:

Currently the total global market of Herbal Products and Medicinal Plants is US$ 60 billion with a double digit growth. The diversified use of plant derived products and its acceptance worldwide made the sector very promising one. According to the World Bank Report 1998, world trade in medicinal plants and related products is expected to be US$ 5 trillion by 2050.

Some of the factors which indicate good potential are as under-

 

  • Market for Dietary supplements growing in both USA and EU markets.
  • More than 70% of population in developed countries have tried and regularly depend on Natural products for health care solutions
  • Chinese & Indian medicinal products and practice have found good acceptance in majority countries of the world
  • YOGA as a science has been well accepted and is gaining firm footing in health care segments in most developed countries.
  • Wellness and Wellbeing centres/ Spa’s are a growing fancy in western countries.
  • There is a definite interest in Ayurvedic courses in curriculum of major US Universities. Diploma courses have been instituted in colleges in the United Kingdom.

WHO and its Member States cooperate to promote the use of traditional medicine for health care. The collaboration aims to:

 

  • Support and integrate traditional medicine into national health systems in combination with national policy and regulation for products, practices and providers to ensure safety and quality;
  • Ensure the use of safe, effective and quality products and practices, based on available evidence;
  • Acknowledge traditional medicine as part of primary health care, to increase access to care and preserve knowledge and resources; and
  • Ensure patient safety by upgrading the skills and knowledge of traditional medicine providers.

Sector Profile: Current Status of Medicinal Plant & Herbal
Product

  • According to a report of WHO about 80% of the world population rely on traditional medicine for their Primary Health Care needs. Even in the developed countries, complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) is gaining more popularity and is being developed. WHO has forecasted in 2020 this market will be of 3 trillion dollar and in 2050 it will be 5 trillion dollar.
  • On an average, 48% of the American prefers herbal medicine. The United States spends about 5 million US Dollars per year for herbal products and normally 20% of the people use herbal commodities and medication. In addition, in China, herbal medicine accounts for 40% of all healthcares delivered and about 200 million patients are covered by it per annum. 70% of the population in Chile and 40% in Colombia use herbal drugs. 48% of the population in Australia, 70% in Canada, 38% in Belgium and 75% in France prefer herbal products. The United Kingdom imports about 90% of its medicinal herb and the requirement involves about 139 million euro market.

Fig: world market of herbal remedies according to WHO report

  • In Bangladesh, a long tradition of indigenous herbal medicinal systems, based on the rich local plant diversity, is considered as very important component of the primary health care system. In Bangladesh, about 500 plant species have been identified as medicinal plant because of their therapeutic properties (Ghani, 2000).
  • In the mean time, a large number of industries (400 herbal factories) have been established in this country for producing Ayurvedic and Unani medicines. It has been estimated that Bangladesh has a market of about 330-core taka worth herbal products annually.

Graph: Yearly turnover of traditional medicine sector of Bangladesh

  • A recent study on Medicinal Plants Marketing in Bangladesh sponsored by SEDF and Interco operation (IC) conducted in October 2003, reviewed the current status and estimated the quantity and value of medicinal plants used as raw materials both in organized sector (large companies, small companies), unorganized sector (herbal doctors/practitioner) and spent annually on approximately 17500 tones medicinal plant (mostly dry) materials accounting approximately Tk. 81 Cr.• A recent study on Medicinal Plants Marketing in Bangladesh sponsored by SEDF and Interco operation (IC) conducted in October 2003, reviewed the current status and estimated the quantity and value of medicinal plants used as raw materials both in organized sector (large companies, small companies), unorganized sector (herbal doctors/practitioner) and spent annually on approximately 17500 tones medicinal plant (mostly dry) materials accounting approximately Tk. 81 Cr.
  • In terms of volume, about 70% of the medicinal plants used as raw materials (over 12.5 thousand tones) come from local Bangladesh source and the remaining part is imported.
  • In terms of value, however, the medicinal plants materials grown in Bangladesh accounts for 40% only, thus reflecting need of both crop diversification as well as quality assurance of the locally grown medicinal plants. The large 20 herbal medicines processing companies of Bangladesh alone utilizes about 25% of raw material (950 tones imported and 4500 tones of Bangladesh produce) demand, whereas another 400 smaller processing companies accounts for 30% of the demand (1150 tones imported and 4900 tones local produce).
  • In terms of volume, about 70% of the medicinal plants used as raw materials (over 12.5 thousand tones) come from local Bangladesh source and the remaining part is imported. In terms of value, however, the medicinal plants materials grown in Bangladesh accounts for 40% only, thus reflecting need of both crop diversification as well as quality assurance of the locally grown medicinal plants. The large 20 herbal medicines processing companies of Bangladesh alone utilizes about 25% of raw material (950 tones imported and 4500 tones of Bangladesh produce) demand, whereas another 400 smaller processing companies accounts for 30% of the demand (1150 tones imported and 4900 tones local produce).

Currently Government is taking following initiatives for the development of this sector

  • The herbal medicine sector also received a further boost as the government termed herbs and herbal medicine as one of the five priority sectors to diversify the country’s export basket.o The herbal medicine sector also received a further boost as the government termed herbs and herbal medicine as one of the five priority sectors to diversify the country’s export basket.
  • An independent and autonomous council named Medicinal Plant & Herbal Product Business Promotion Council formed under Ministry of Commerce. The council is working as public-private partnership for export diversification and overall business development.
  • A dedicated board under Ministry of Health & Family Welfare formed as Bangladesh Board of Unani and Ayurvedic systems.
  • Government formed a cell for medicinal plant in the ‘Ministry of Environment and Forest’. The cell is working in different dimension for developing the medicinal plant sector, like (1) a research center for medicinal plant, (2) promoting neem plantation, (3) medicinal plant seedling production through tissue culture, and (4) leasing of lands for medicinal plant cultivation.
  • At the same time some initiatives are also taken by the Department of Forestry. Fifty seven different medicinal plant varieties are planted in the adjacent area of Salna national park, Gazipur. In 2001-02 financial year, it was only on 2.02 acre land. Later in the year they extended it to 35 acre land.
  • The government is also selling different medicinal plants at a subsidized rate in 400 different government nurseries all over the country. There are also 450 sub-centers in each upazila under the 400 government nurseries.

Initiatives from the private sectors are also mentionable- Currently following six associations are working with Ministry of Commerce for the development of the sector

  • Bangladesh Ayurvedic Medicine Manufacturers Association (BAMMA)
  • Bangladesh Homeopathic Medicine Manufacturers Association (BHMMA)
  • Bangladesh Unani Aushadh Shilpa Samity (BUASS);
  • Bangladesh Herbal Products Manufacturing Association (BHPMA).
  • Bangladesh Neem Foundation; and 
  • Herbal Product, Cosmetic and Dietary Supplement Manufacturers Association of Bangladesh  

There are some private companies like ‘Neem Foundation, The ACME Laboratories Ltd., Square Herbal & Neutraceuticals Ltd. and Modern Herbal Group of Companies’ who have farms of medicinal plants. The ‘Neem foundation’ also has a medicinal farm at Faridpur district. They planted different medicinal plants basically neem plants. They are preparing different neem beauty products. The ACME & Square have a medicinal farm at Bogura, Gaibandha, Rangpur and chattagram district.

From the above discussion, it is clear that the medicinal plant cultivation is still in a rudimentary stage. Business Promotion Council under the supervision of Ministry of Commerce is actively identifying and working with the development issues and factors for the infrastructure development as well as export diversification of Medicinal Plants & Herbal sector.

Export Scenario of Bangladesh

  • Total export value of medicinal plants from Bangladesh amounted to US$ 7.69 thousand in FY 2017-18, while the value was US$ 5.16 thousand in FY 2016-17. Bangladesh is enjoying duty-free market access to Vietnam, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, Fiji, Georgia and other countries for herbal products. There are plenty of opportunities to expand the country’s export share of herbal products in these markets.
  • Major export destinations are Vietnam, Hong Kong, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia, Cambodia, Fiji, Georgia, United Arab Emirates, Myanmar, Thailand, Oman, Romania, Malaysia, United Kingdom, Austria, India, Singapore and Yemen. Moreover, we are exploring many other countries in Asia Pacific, Africa, Europe and Latin America for exporting herbal products.
Countries Export value in 2015-16 Export value in 2016-17 Export value in 2017-18
Vietnam 315,245.01 ……. ……
United Arab Emirates 3,533.09 ……. 5,054.78
Myanmar 2,340.33 ……. ……
Malaysia 3,303.22 529.02 ……
United Kingdom 10,017.89 ……. ……
Singapore 87.22 ……. ……
France 1,714.06 ……. ……
Pakistan ……. 4,635.20 ……
Germany ……. ……. 2,643.57
Total 336240.81 5164.22 7,698.35

(Source: Export promotion Bureau)

Activities

Recent Activities:

Business Promotion Council under the supervision of Ministry of Commerce is actively identifying and working with the development issues and factors for the infrastructure development as well as export diversification of Medicinal Plants & Herbal sector. Some of the recent activities of Medicinal Plant & Herbal Product Business Promotion Council are mentioned bellow-

1. Bangladesh Board of Unani and Ayurvedic Systems of Medicines and Medicinal Plants and Herbal Products Business Promotion Council jointly arranged a conference at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre on 16 June 2013. Where The Prime Minister was the Chief Guest.

2. Herbal Product, Cosmetic and Dietary Supplement Manufacturers Association of Bangladesh (HPCDSMAB) has implemented a seminar on “Importance of herbal products & dietary supplements for leading a healthy life” at Bangladesh Asiatic Society Auditorium, Dhaka on 16 January’ 2016. Hon’ble Minister Md. Mujibul Haque, MP, Ministry of Railway and communication and chairman, Bangladesh Board of Unani and Ayurvedic System of Medicine was the chief guest of inaugural session and Hon’ble Minister Advocate Qamrul Islam, MP, Food Minister, the Government of the people’s republic of Bangladesh was the chief guest of closing session.

3. Bangladesh Ayurvedic Medicine Manufacturers Association (BAMMA) has implemented a program on “Quality Development and Export Possibility of Ayurvedic Medicine” at Institution of Diploma Engineers Auditorium, Dhaka on 03 January’ 2016. Hon’ble Minister Mr. Hasanul Haq Inu, MP, Information Minister, the Government of the people’s republic of Bangladesh was the chief guest. Major General Md. Mostafizur Rahman, Director General, Drugs Administration, Ministry of Health & Family welfare and Dr. Dilip Ray, Chairman of Bangladesh Homoeopathic Board were special guests.

4. Bangladesh Herbal Products Manufacturing Association (BHPMA) has implemented a seminar on “Current affairs of medicinal plants & herbal products in Bangladesh” at FBCCI Auditorium, Dhaka on 17 May’ 2016. Mr. Abdul Matlub Ahmad, President, Federation of Bangladesh Chambers of Commerce & Industry was the chief guest of the program. Mr. Fakir Firoz Ahmmad, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Commerce & Coordinator, Business Promotion Council and Mr. Md. Shariful Islam, First Vice President, FBCCI were the special guests. Mr. Tapan Chowdhury, President, BHPMA was present in the program.

5. Bangladesh Homoeopathic Medicine Manufacturers Association (BHMMA) has implemented a training program on “Development of Product Quality of Homoeopathy Medicine” at Sylhet on 16 March, 2018. Mr. Badar Uddin Ahmed Kamran, Former Mayor, Sylhet City Corporation was the chief guest of the program.

6. Bangladesh Unani Aushadh Shilpa Samity (BUASS) has implemented a seminar on “Importance of following G.M.P. in the production of unani Medicine” at Dhaka on 28 January, 2018. Mr. Advocate Qamrul Islam, MP, Former Food Minister, was the chief guest of the program.

7. Bangladesh Unani Aushadh Shilpa Samity (BUASS) has implemented a training program on “Cultivation and Primary Processing of Exportable Medicinal Plants” at Zilla Shilpakala Academy, Nilphamary on 10 November, 2017. Freedom fighter, Md. Jaynal Abedin, Chairman, Nilphamery Zilla Parishad was the chief guest.

8. Bangladesh Herbal Products Manufacturing Association (BHPMA) has implemented a traini8ng on “Cultivation and Processing of Commercially Important Medicinal Plant” at Rural Development Academy, Pirojpur on 21 June’ 2018. Mr. Abu Ahmed Siddique, District Commissioner, Pirojpur present as the chief guest and Dr. Fakhrul Alam, Civil Surgeon, Pirojpur, Dr. Dipak Kumar Hawlader, Medical Officer, (A.M.C), Pirojpur, were the special guests. was present in the program.